Ischemic heart disease. Ischemia is a decrease in blood supply to a body organ, tissue or partially arrested by constriction or blockage of the blood vessels, and it is the right medical term for reduced blood flow to the heart. Cured or blocked arteries usually cause us, and it is the leading cause of death in most Western countries. The growth of these tissues is called arteriosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis typically begins in early adolescence but is rarely diagnosed until late in life usually due to a stroke or heart attack. Autopsies of healthy young men who died during the Korean and Vietnam War showed signs of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment can stop the progression of atherosclerosis and prevent a medical emergency.

According to the United States data for 2004 for about 65% of men and 47% of women, the first symptom of atherosclerosis is a heart attack or sudden cardiac death (death within one hour after onset of symptoms) or obstruction of the arteries that cause the Brain as a result of a stroke.

Another problem that can cause ischemic heart disease is an aneurysm. It is a localized, pathological, blood-filled dilation of a blood vessel causing a weakling from the vascular wall. Plaque forms in the arteries causing it an obstacle and the blood flow around the constipation pressure on the walls of the arteries. This can cause the walls of the arteries to balloon out and weaken as the blood moves around the obstacle. If one of these balloons or aneurysms explodes then death can occur within minutes.

When the plaque is displaced from the arterial walls it will travel into the heart and cause one of the blood vessels of the heart to get blocked, causing a heart attack. If the plaque gets lodged in one of the blood vessels, the blood supply to the brain, then it becomes a stroke.

Ischemic is caused by a diet rich in fats and physical inactivity. A high-fat diet leads to high levels of cholesterol in the blood. The American Heart Association offers a range of guidelines for total blood cholesterol and heart disease risk. The desirable LDL is less than 100 mg/dl. However, the report from the National Cholesterol Education Program in 1987 suggesting that total blood cholesterol should be below 200 mg / dL of normal blood cholesterol when cholesterol levels between 200 and 239 mg / dL are considered borderline high, and higher than 240 mg/dl is considered high cholesterol.

doctors-tips-of-prevention-and-cognition-heart-attacks

Many scientists, nutritionists, and activists are concerned about ischemic heart disease, and they are trying to educate the American people into a healthier diet. And this power of healthy suggestion seems to work on restaurants. Especially since 2004, fast food chains have begun to offer healthier menu options such as yogurt, salads, and fruits. Many restaurants now print some nutritional information on their menus and specifically offer heart-smart recipes.

Over-the-counter products and Vitamins are common and can help relieve heart diseases such as Pectin, Foti, Vitamin C, Niacin, and EPA. Foti also called He Shou Wu in China is legendary in his ability to extend life. Modern studies have shown that Foti has the ability to lower serum cholesterol, prevent premature gray hair, promote red cell growth, increase blood and longevity at the cellular level. This herb raises the level of naturally occurring antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the body. Foti can reduce blood cholesterol by inhibiting intestinal absorption, which helps to reduce atherosclerosis and other heart diseases.

Niacin is the next thing, a perfect treatment that corrects most causes of coronary heart disease. Niacin blocks the release of fatty acids from the fat cells. Niacin plays an important role in gene expression, energy production, and hormone synthesis. You can not live without it. Niacin also tends to alter LDL particle distribution to larger particle size and improve HDL functioning. The intake of 3 g of niacin for less than two weeks to reduce serum cholesterol by 26 percent.

Vitamin C has been shown to counteract the development of cholesterol deposits in the arteries. Within hours of receiving vitamin C patients showed a sharp decline in blood cholesterol.

Pectin limits the amount of cholesterol your body can absorb. High pectin in apples can count why “One day keeps the doctor away”.

Studies of Greenland Eskimo’s lack of heart attacks have shown that Eico Sapentaenoic Acid (EPA) lowers cholesterol significantly, even more than polyunsaturated fat. It also triggers a significant reduction in triglycerides. Salmon oil is one of the most famous natural EPA sources.

If you are at risk of heart disease then you will find a good health care professional before beginning any kind of home treatment.

Always ask your doctor before using this information, this article is nutritional in nature and is not considered medical advice.

Cardiomegaly is not a disease, but the symptom of a problem with the heart, which causes it to become enlarged. Your heart may become enlarged during pregnancy, or due to a condition that puts stress on the heart, such as coronary artery disease, prolapse or stenosis of one of the heart valves, or problems in the electrical heart rhythm. Occasionally the cause of an enlarged heart may not be known.

The symptoms of cardiomegaly are variable. In the early stages, no symptoms will be felt. Then, as the heart continues to grow, some people will not experience any symptoms at all, while others experience shortness of breath, dizziness, an abnormal heart rate, cough, chest pain or swelling in the feet. The symptoms may be caused by the condition that causes the heart to be enlarged. For example, if your heart valves have been damaged by rheumatic heart disease, you may notice an irregular heartbeat, also called an arrhythmia. Some cardiac arrhythmias cause shortness of breath and dizziness.

High blood pressure causes the heart to work harder to pump blood through the body. When the heart needs to beat faster or harder, the muscles thicken producing cardiomyopathy or stiffening of the heart muscle, which can lead to cardiomegaly over time.

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A heart attack, infections, connective tissue disorders, congenital heart disease, certain medications, and cancer radiation can all damage heart, producing enlargement. Pulmonary hypertension or high blood pressure in the lungs can increase the heart’s workload, causing the right side to be enlarged.

Iron deficiency anemia, resulting in a lack of red blood cells, produces a domino effect. If there are fewer red blood cells to transport oxygen, the heart must work harder to pump more blood to form the lack of oxygen. Over time, untreated anemia can lead to an enlarged heart. On the other hand, too much iron, or a problem with iron metabolism can put pressure on the left side of the heart, weakening the muscles and making balancing cardiomegaly.

Thyroid disorders, both a sluggish thyroid and an overactive thyroid can cause heart problems and cardiomegaly. A rare blood disorder called amyloidosis causes amyloids to build up abnormal proteins in the heart because of it’s an enlargement.

Cardiomegaly may be asymptomatic or very serious, depending on the underlying cause or heart disease. The aim of the treatment is to control the symptoms and reduce whatever damage is caused by the factors causing enlargement of the heart. Cardiomegaly cannot be cured, and usually can not be reversed, but it can be successfully treated and the symptoms controlled.

A low-fat diet program for high cholesterol is concerned about consuming a variety of low-fat, heart-healthy foods as propagated by the American Heart Association (AHA). These foods can help remove harmful cholesterol from the body. In addition to eating the most beneficial foods, they need you to be prepared in a healthy manner to get optimal results. Plus, no heart-healthy diet completely without exercise, a known cholesterol-lowering factor.

Heart-healthy foods

Eat heart-healthy food. Be in accordance with the AHA, heart-healthy foods are high in fiber, low in fat and high in antioxidants. These heart-healthy foods can increase your “bad” cholesterol level (LDL) as well as decrease your “good” cholesterol level (HDL). Soluble fiber helps remove harmful cholesterol from the body.

Eat soluble fiber foods. Notable sources of soluble fiber include whole grains, lentils and beans, nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables, and healthy oils of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated varieties. The USDA recommends eating at least 10g of soluble fiber daily to lower your LDL.

Eat oatmeal. A 1 1/2 cup serving of oatmeal, it says in the Mayo Clinic, contains 6 grams of soluble fiber. In fresh fruit and increase soluble fiber of 4 g. Top with cinnamon and low-fat milk to start your low-fat diet for high cholesterol day nutritiously.

Eat plant sterol foods as part of your low-fat diet for high cholesterol. Plant sterols contain a strong lowering of the cholesterol property along with many beneficial antioxidants. According to the American Dietetic Association, herbal sterols are notable in low-fat soy products such as tofu, tempeh, soy and soy milk; walnuts; avocados; Linseed and sunflower seeds. You can also buy foods fortified with plant sterols such as orange juice, margarine and fruit smoothies.

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Not Heart Healthy Foods

Watch out for saturated and trans fats. Foods containing these fats, according to the Mayo Clinic and USDA, can increase your “bad” cholesterol levels.

Saturated fats are found in animal products such as offal and whole-fat dairy products, including egg yolks and red meats. These fats are also found in fried foods, processed and prepackaged foods, biscuits, bread, and many fast foods.

Food Preparation Methods

Choose heart-healthy cooking methods. According to the AHA and the USDA, if your food is made in an unhealthy method, such as deep frying, it can increase your LDL level. Healthy Cooking Methods to choose high cholesterol from your low-fat diet include steaming, grilling, poaching, and baking (without excessive oils).

Physical activity

Exercise. Your low-fat high-cholesterol diet must also include daily physical activity, according to the AHA. It is recommended to have 30 minutes daily for at least five days a week. The exercise does not have to be exhausting for you to reap health benefits. Physical activity can lower your LDL. Choose activities that you are happy with and switch to avoid boredom.

A vicious circle – the best way to describe the interaction of blood pressure with nicotine. At the end of the cycle, in addition to numerous organ diseases, there is also a heart attack. Although the summary of the problem can be expressed very simply, the actual process is highly complex. In addition, smoking addiction can also act as an enhancer of existing blood pressure problems.

The interaction of the organs

The causes of the rise in blood pressure caused by smoking addiction are three main factors. Specifically, they would be bad enough in and of themselves, but their inevitable interaction within body mechanisms makes them even more of a threat.

Sympathetic activity: The sympathetic nervous system is that part of the autonomic nervous system that controls the regulation of blood pressure as well as metabolic and respiratory functions. Under the influence of nicotine, however, this control mechanism gets out of balance and among other things causes an increase in heart activity and resistance within the blood vessels. The result is cardiac arrhythmia and partial to complete occlusion of the vessels.

Vessel constriction: As a result of the imbalance in the sympathetic or as a direct effect of smoking addiction, the narrowing of the blood vessels forms the core aspect of nicotine-related hypertension. Responsible for the vascular closure is not only the nicotine per se. Also contained in cigarette smoke additives may favor the arterial closure. Furthermore, the circulation and pumping capacity of the heart and blood vessels are severely impaired by the harmful substances, which offers hypertension further bases for manifestation. In this context, the danger of blood thickening caused by the smoke should not be underestimated, which may lead to further blockage of the vessels.

Lack of oxygen: Since the cigarette smoke a large amount of carbon monoxide gets into the blood, with permanent nicotine consumption and the supply of organs, especially the heart, with oxygen at risk. Now O2 is of essential importance for the integrity of the organs and their functionality. A deficiency supply, therefore, brings about serious organ damage. Heart attacks and strokes are thus the worst danger when smoking, while hypertension in this area, merely ‘a precursor to the complete failure of the heart.

Hypertension-and-Smoking-Addiction

The interaction of risk factors

The exact value of systolic blood pressure increase is between 7 mmHg and 10 mmHg when smoking. However, further increases may be added if smoking is associated with one of the following aspects.

  • Smoking due to stress in most cases implies that high blood pressure is already present before consumption. This results from the increased heart activity that results from stressful situations.
  • The same applies to cigarette consumption in combination with obesity. In addition, weight-related arteriosclerosis and vasoconstrictive substances meet and, together, provide even greater resistance within the blood vessels.
  • Smoking addiction in concert with alcohol can not only increase the risk of hypertension but also of cardiac arrhythmia. As nicotine constricts the vessels, alcohol temporarily expands them so that the pumping intervals of the heart become completely out of balance.

Also in connection with lack of exercise or a wrong diet, the risk of high blood pressure by smoking is greater than normal. In addition to the dysfunctional properties of nicotine here are still added to a nutrient deficiency or resilience problems that affect the activity of the heart and organs. Already existing dysfunctions of the organs, such as those caused by unhealthy foods or too little exercise, are further expanded by smoking cigarettes.

Heart valve disease can affect any of the valves in the heart. The heart valves have flaps for opening and closing with each heartbeat, allowing blood to flow through the heart of the upper and lower chambers and the rest of the body.

The heart has four valves :

  1. Tricuspid valve located between the right atrium and the right ventricle
  2. Pulmonary valve located between the right atrium and the pulmonary artery
  3. Mitral valve, which is located between the left atrium, and left ventricle
  4. Aortic valve between the left ventricle and the aorta

Blood flows from the right and left atria across the tricuspid and mitral valve, allowing the blood to flow into the right and left ventricles. These valves then close the blood flowing back into the atria. Once the heart chambers are filled with blood, they begin to contract, forcing the lung and aortic valves to open. Blood then flows into the pulmonary artery and the aorta. The pulmonary artery carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs and the aorta, the body’s largest artery, is responsible for carrying oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body.

Basically, the heart valves work by making sure that blood flows in the forward direction and does not secure or leaks. If an individual has a valvular disease, the valve will not be able to do this job properly. This can be caused by regurgitation, stenosis or a combination of both.

Some individuals may experience no symptoms while other disorders such as strokes, heart attacks, and thrombosis occur when the heart valve disease is left untreated.

Valvular heart disease

Mitral valve prolapse

This can also be called floppy valve syndrome, click marbles syndrome, balloon mitral valve or Barlow syndrome. It occurs when the mitral valve does not close properly, sometimes causing blood to flow back into the left atrium.

Most people with mitral valve prolapse do not require symptoms and no treatment as a result. However, symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue and coughing may indicate that treatment is necessary.

The treatment includes surgery to repair or replace the mitral valve.

Bicuspid aortic veins

This happens when a person is born with an aortic valve that has two valves instead of the usual three. In very severe cases, symptoms of this type of disorder are present at birth. However, some people may know that they have decades to go without this type of disorder. The valve is usually able to work for years without causing any symptoms, so most people with premolar aortic valve disease are usually diagnosed only in adulthood. According to the Cleveland Clinic, 80 percent of people with this form of heart valve disease will be operated to repair or replace the valve, which usually happens when they are in their 30s or 40s.

Symptoms include shortness of breath during exercise, chest pain and dizziness or fainting. Most people are able to successfully repair their aortic valve with surgery.

Valvular

This occurs when a valve is unable to fully open, which means that insufficient blood is able to flow through the valve. This can affect one of the heart valves and can be caused by the heart valve thickening or stiffening.

Symptoms can include chest pain, shortness of breath, tiredness, dizziness, and fainting. Some people do not need treatment. Other people may use valvuloplasty, which uses a balloon to inflate the valve or flap replacement surgery.

Valve insufficiency

This can also be called a “leaky valve” and occurs when one of the heart valves does not close properly, causing the blood to flow backward. Symptoms include shortness of breath, coughing, tiredness, palpitations, drowsiness, and swelling of the feet and ankles.

The effects of valve failure vary from person to person. Some people need to monitor their condition. Others may need prescribed medications to prevent fluid retention while others have valve repair or replacement.

Causes Of Valvular Heart Disease

There are a number of causes of various heart valve diseases. Causes can be :

  • birth defect
  • Endocarditis inflammation of the heart tissue
  • Rheumatic fever inflammatory disease brought on after group A streptococcal infection
  • Age-related changes, such as calcification
  • Heart attack
  • coronary artery disease
  • Cardiomyopathy degenerative changes in the heart muscle
  • Syphilis is a relatively rare sexually transmitted infection
  • hypertension
  • Aortic aneurysms abnormal swelling or protrusion of the aorta
  • Atherosclerosis Arteriosclerosis
  • myxomatous degeneration weakening of the connective tissue in the mitral valve
  • Lupus a chronic autoimmune disease,

heart-valve-disease-symptoms

Heart Valve Disease Symptoms

Symptoms of heart valve disorders according to the severity of the disease. Usually, the onset of symptoms indicates that the disorder is affecting blood flow. Many people with mild or moderate valvular heart disease experience no symptoms. However, symptoms can be :

  • shortness of breath
  • palpitation
  • fatigue
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness and fainting
  • a headache
  • to cough
  • Water retention or swelling in the lower extremities and abdomen
  • Pulmonary edema or excess fluid in the lungs

How are heart valve diseases diagnosed?

If you have symptoms of heart valve disease, your doctor will start by listening to the heart using a stethoscope. He or she will listen for any heart rate abnormalities that might indicate a problem with the heart valves. Your doctor may also listen to the lungs to determine if there is fluid retention as well as check your body for signs of water retention, both symptoms of heart valve problems.

Other tests that can diagnose for valvular heart disease include :

  • Electrocardiogram is a test that shows the electrical activity of the heart. This test is used to check arrhythmia.
  • Echocardiography uses sound waves to create an image of the heart valves and chambers.
  • Cardiac catheterization is another test to diagnose valve disorders. This test uses a thin tube or catheter with a camera to take pictures of the heart and blood vessels. This can help to determine with your doctor the nature and severity of the diseased valve.
  • A chest x-ray can be ordered to take a picture of your heart. This may be your doctor if your heart is enlarged.

Magnetic resonance imaging can create a more detailed picture of the heart. This can help to confirm a diagnosis and help your doctor determine how best to treat your valve disorder.

  • A stress test can also be used to determine how the symptoms are affected by physical exertion. The information from the stress test can help your doctor determine the severity of your condition.

Treatment Options

Treatments for heart valve disorders depend on the severity of the disease and symptoms. Most doctors recommend starting with conservative treatment. This includes :

  • consistent medical supervision
  • smoking
  • a healthy diet

Medications that are usually prescribed are :

  • Beta-blocker and calcium channel blocker to help control heart rate and blood flow
  • Reduce diuretics for fluid retention
  • vasodilating drugs that open or dilate the blood vessels

Surgery may be needed if the symptoms increase in severity. This can be used to repair heart valves with patient’s own tissues or heart valve replacement with animal valves, donated valves,

Diastolic cardiac insufficiency exists when signs and symptoms of heart failure are present, but the left ventricular systolic function is still preserved (ejection fraction above 45%). It is important to differentiate the diastolic from the systolic heart failure so that it can be optimally treated.

The incidence of diastolic heart failure increases with age; in about 50 percent of elderly patients with heart failure, there is isolated diastolic dysfunction, write Chhabi Satpathy and colleagues in the American Family Physician. If diastolic dysfunction is diagnosed early and adequately treated, the prognosis is better than for systolic dysfunction.

Diastolic heart failure is clinically and radiologically indistinguishable from systolic heart failure. However, if there is a normal ejection fraction and an abnormal diastolic function with signs and symptoms of heart failure, diastolic heart failure can be diagnosed. Unlike systolic, diastolic heart failure can occur in isolation. Common causes of diastolic dysfunction include cardiac ischemia, hypertension, aging, obesity, and aortic stenosis. Rarely, the disorder is caused by myocardial diseases such as cardiomyopathy, storage diseases, and amyloidosis or sarcoidosis or by a disease of the pericardium.

In isolated diastolic dysfunction, there is a disorder of isovolumic ventricular relaxation and decreased compliance of the left ventricle. The transmission of higher end-diastolic pressures into the pulmonary circulation can cause pulmonary congestion leading to dyspnea and eventually right heart failure.

Diagnostics

Heart failure may be manifested by fatigue, exertional dyspnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea, cervical venous stasis, rales, tachycardia, third or fourth heart sounds, hepatomegaly, and edema. Cardiomegaly and congestion of the pulmonary veins often occur in chest radiographs, but these findings are non-specific and can also occur in non-cardiac diseases. It is difficult to distinguish diastolic from systolic heart failure on the basis of physical examination alone.

Two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography is of great importance in the diagnosis of diastolic heart failure. This study not only provides important information about ventricular size, myocardium, heart valves, systolic function, and pericardium but also provides information on diastolic transmitral and pulmonary venous blood flow. In echocardiography, the peak velocity of blood flow through the mitral valve in the early diastolic filling phase corresponds to the e-wave. The atrial contraction corresponds to the A-wave. From these values, the I / O quotient is calculated. Usually, E is greater than A, and the I / O ratio is about 1.5.

In early diastolic dysfunction, relaxation is disturbed and the I / O ratio drops to less than 1.0 with atrial contraction. As the disease progresses, left ventricular compliance decreases, increasing left atrial pressure and early left ventricular filling despite disturbed relaxation. This paradoxical normalization of the I / O quotient is called “pseudo-normalization”. In patients with severe diastolic dysfunction, the left ventricle is filled, especially in early diastole, resulting in an I/O ratio above 2.0. Although cardiac catheterization is preferred in the diagnosis of diastolic dysfunction. However, two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography has proven to be the best noninvasive method in everyday clinical practice. Rarely, radionuclide angiography is performed, especially in patients who find echocardiography technically difficult.

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Treatment

Primary prevention of diastolic heart failure includes nicotine abstinence and the aggressive treatment of high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, and coronary heart disease. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss, cessation of smoking, diet change, restriction of alcohol intake and physical activity serve to prevent diastolic and systolic heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction can remain asymptomatic for many years. Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent irreversible structural changes and systolic dysfunction. At first glance, it seems that the treatment of diastolic and systolic heart failure is not very different. However, the treatment of diastolic heart failure is limited due to the lack of large randomized controlled trials. In addition, the optimal treatment for systolic heart failure may result in exacerbation of diastolic heart failure.

Improvement of the left ventricular function

For diastolic dysfunction, it is important to control the heart rate and prevent tachycardia to maximize the diastolic filling period. Beta-blockers are particularly useful for this purpose, but they do not directly affect myocardial relaxation. Beta blockers should be used in particular for the treatment of diastolic heart failure, if a high blood pressure, coronary heart disease or arrhythmia.

Optimization of hemodynamics

Hemodynamic optimization is achieved primarily by reducing cardiac preload and afterload. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers

More and more people today are suffering from cardiovascular diseases such as high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis and heart problems of various kinds. The cost of treatment for patients with atherosclerotic diseases is increasing rapidly. Experts predict that they will triple by the year 2030. This raises the question: Who should pay for it and why are not these illnesses declining, despite today’s medical possibilities?

The cause of cardiovascular disease

Cardiovascular diseases are typical diseases of civilization, which are now in the list of the most common causes of death in the first place. Actually, this development is completely incomprehensible, because it is well known that diseases such as hypertension and arteriosclerosis, which are causally responsible for the development of stroke and heart attack, are so-called affluent diseases. And this prosperity goes hand in hand with a widespread over- and malnutrition. Since it would be logical, already preventive, but at the latest in the treatment of existing diseases to set exactly at this point. At this point, we would like to inform you about how you can prevent arteriosclerotic diseases – ranging from increased blood pressure to stroke or heart attack – through targeted nutrition.

Does a modern lifestyle require modern food?

Nowadays time is passing us by. Everything is always faster and everything should be bigger, better and more functional. Unfortunately, this development does not stop at our food. Our food today no longer deserves this name, which describes a living means of life. The word food is certainly more appropriate because it is now predominantly about products that are full, but especially sick. We need to come back to those healthy foods that provide our body with all the nutrients and vital nutrients to withstand the tremendous demands of today.

The quality of our food

Most of the food consumed by us in the form of canned bagged or other prepared meals consist largely of heavily processed raw materials of inferior quality. Through the processing process, nutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are denatured and vital nutrients such as vitamins, enzymes, phytonutrients, etc. are no longer present, or only in traces. Our body suffers a severe deficiency, which manifests itself in different diseases. Of course, the cardiovascular system also reacts to the nutrient and vital substance deficit with corresponding symptoms.

Excessive consumption of refined salt, refined sugar, white flour products and foods contaminated with a wide variety of preservatives, colorants, flavor enhancers, etc. also has negative effects on heart health.

Tips for the best diet for heart healthy

Of course, the following tips will not only help protect your heart and keep you healthy. Your entire organism will benefit:

  • Do not use finished products as far as possible.
  • Instead, buy seasonal region food such as fresh, organically grown fruits and vegetables.
  • If you eat animal products, pay attention to biological, animal welfare or buy products from grazing.
  • Use unprocessed stone or Ursalz salt and season your meals as often as possible with fresh herbs.
  • When using fats, always ensure first-class organic quality and avoid consistently hydrogenated fats such as margarine, hardened palm or coconut fat. In finished products, almost exclusively hardened fats are used.
  • Exchange the unhealthy snacks (chips, pretzel sticks, biscuits, etc.) for healthy alternatives such as nuts, almonds, spelled sticks, rice waffles, chocolate with a high cocoa content, etc.
  • Drink as many as 2 liters of still water per day, so that your body can excrete already existing pollutants as quickly as possible.

Good fats protect the heart

“Eat rich in fat instead of low fat”. This recommendation completely contradicts what the vernacular usually holds to be correct, because so far was that a low-fat diet, the health of the heart would benefit. However, it has long been recognized that fat is a very important component of a functioning nutrient exchange and that a lack of healthy fats can contribute to chronic inflammation, which in turn leads to vascular damage and thus to heart disease. Especially important in this context is the quality of the fats. Healthy fats, which include primarily high-quality vegetable oils that are rich in unsaturated fatty acids, provide good protection against heart disease. In particular, fats with a high proportion of omega 3 (linseed oil, hemp oil, etc.) are of great benefit to the heart and should, therefore, be consumed daily.

But also high quality saturated fats are beneficial to heart health, such as. Native and cold pressed organic coconut oil (not to be confused with hardened coconut fat, which is found in many finished products). Natural coconut oil contains the so-called lauric acid, which increases the proportion of “good” cholesterol in the body and thus supports the health of the heart.

Omega 3 fatty acids

Cold-pressed organic vegetable oils with high omega-3 content are regarded as extremely valuable oils, especially with regard to heart health. Omega-3 fatty acids are able to keep the walls of the vessels flexible, promote blood circulation, inhibit the formation of blood clots and reduce inflammatory processes in the body. Of course, the cardiovascular system benefits first and foremost from these wonderful properties. Therefore, the use of an omega-3-rich vegetable oil, especially for already existing heart problems is strongly recommended. Since the positive properties of omega-3 fatty acids also affect other body areas, use of these oils is generally indicated.

Omega 3-rich oils should not be used exclusively, but always in combination or in alternation with other high-quality oils and fats.

Omega 6 fatty acids

People with a predisposition to cardiovascular disease should avoid vegetable oils with a high omega-6 fatty acid content. The reason for this is due to the linoleic acid also contained in these oils in large quantities.

Definition: What is a Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and how does it arise? CHD is the most common heart disease of the entire world population. It is also referred to as ischemic heart disease. In Germany, approximately 6 million patients are affected. Scientists believe that the incidence of coronary heart disease will increase with increasing life expectancy.

CHD primarily affects people over the age of 50 and is one of the most frequently reported causes of death in all industrialized countries. It is a disease of the heart caused by occlusions and constrictions in the coronary arteries.

These arteries are among the blood vessels that supply the heart with energy-giving nutrients and oxygen-rich blood. Especially with physical stress, the blood transport through the body is reduced and there are typical symptoms of CHD.

How is the calcification of coronary arteries formed?

Calcification of coronary arteries is caused by deposition of arteriosclerotic plaques by :

  • cholesterol
  • saturated fatty acids
  • lime-like particles

In some cases, initial nutritional damage already exists due to :

  • high blood pressure
  • Diabetes mellitus

The human immune system does not recognize the plaques as endogenous. This is followed by inflammatory reactions and the plaques become increasingly unstable since activated immune cells no longer fulfill their task and die in the same. Deposits begin to open by the progressive increase. The contents enter the bloodstream and finally the coronary vessels, where it settles again.

Typical symptoms of CHD

Depending on the stage of development of CHD different symptoms occur. It is distinguished into three different forms of stages of coronary heart disease.

Latent CHD

A latent coronary heart disease is characterized by mild to moderate constrictions of the coronary arteries. There is coronary sclerosis.

Although this phase is asymptomatic, there is already a significant mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. Despite the absence of symptoms, it is possible to detect a reduced perfusion of the heart muscle. In diabetics often no typical symptoms are noticeable.

Stable CHD

At this stage, sufferers notice typical CHD symptoms that occur under certain conditions. In most cases, they return alone or can be treated with medication (stable angina pectoris).

Angina Pectoris is the leading symptom of coronary heart disease. Affected notice a feeling of tightness as well as pain directly behind the breastbone. Primarily, the symptoms occur in cold but also exercise. Other factors, such as mental stress or high-fat meals, can trigger these symptoms as well.

The resulting pain often spreads to the left arm or to other body regions such as upper abdomen, jaw or neck.

Other typical symptoms of CHD are:

  • Shortness of breath (shortness of breath)
  • sweats
  • Arrhythmia

Occasionally affected people feel dread. As soon as the affected person comes to rest or stays warm again, these symptoms of angina pectoris return.

Typical symptoms of angina pectoris vary in their frequency, intensity, and duration. They are closely related to the current progression of the CHD. In patients with renal insufficiency or diabetes mellitus, chest pain persists. This also applies to persons over 75 years and operated on. Here are breathlessness, dizziness, nausea, and radiation of pain in the abdominal area as warning signs.

Unstable CHD and acute coronary syndrome

Similar symptoms of angina pectoris also occur here. However, they are significantly stronger and unpredictable (unstable angina pectoris). This expression can not always be adjusted to the medication.

As a result, coronary heart disease leads to a reduced resilience of sufferers and causes a reduction in performance. Depending on the severity, this affects the quality of life. In individual cases, patients can no longer sufficiently fulfill everyday tasks.

At the same time, the clinical picture may continue to deteriorate and become a life-threatening stage of CHD. The so-called acute coronary syndrome is characterized by three manifestations :

  1. Unstable angina pectoris
  2. is characterized by a lack of elevations of the heart enzymes (creatine kinase MB, troponin) in the blood. ECG results show no changes that indicate a heart attack.
  3. Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI, acute myocardial infarction)
  4. shows no changes in the ECG, however, heart enzymes that point to possible heart disease and an infarction, detectable in the blood.
  5. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, acute myocardial infarction)
  6. manifests itself by typical changes in the ECG and detectable cardiac enzyme levels in the blood

As a consequence of these features occurs :

  • Heart failure due to a heart attack
  • Heart arrhythmia due to a myocardial scar or coronary circulatory disorders
  • Sudden cardiac death

Risk factors for the development of CHD

The training of CHD is favored by numerous risk factors. Women over the age of 55 and men over the age of 45 are at particular risk. The previous lifestyle plays a particularly important role here. Unhealthy, high-fat diet, lack of exercise and smoking increase the risk of diseases such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, lipid metabolism and glucose tolerance disorders. As a consequence of this, in turn, a CHD can arise.

Not to be ignored is the family disposition. Special caution is advised when cases of CHD to heart attack have already occurred in the family environment if possible risk factors should be largely avoided and a special focus on a healthy, balanced lifestyle should be laid. 

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The diagnosis of CHD

Due to the risk factors for coronary heart disease described above, the diagnosis begins with an intensive discussion. Besides the risks, complaints are also documented. In addition, an assessment of the physical capacity of the patient.

This is followed by a physical check focusing on the legs, lungs, and heart. Possible signs of CHD include :

  • Cardiac malformations such as aortic valve stenosis
  • rattling breathing due to pulmonary congestion
  • heart failure

Weight, heart rate, blood pressure, and vascular status are also determined

Stents heart are small tubes that are suitable in arteries or ducts to keep them open when compromised. There are a variety of stents designed for various procedures and applications. Some of the procedures include the use of coronary, esophageal, ureteral and biliary stents. Most of them are made of stainless mesh and plastic steel; however, there are other stents that act as transplants and these are made from a special tissue. There are a number of common stents heart side effects that can occur and these could include clotting, calcification, bleeding, and pain.

There are two types of stent heart that are typically used: bare mesh stents and stents that have been coated with a drug. These are referred to as drug-eluting stents and are used to prevent the arteries from restarting. These devices are usually more effective and save lives; however, there are cases where patients experience negative results. Clinical studies using wire mesh stents in the cerebral arteries found that the stents caused strokes in patients. Stent Side Effects When performing procedures for coronary heart blockage can sometimes cause chest pain, swelling of the arms or legs, and bleeding from the puncture site on the groin.

Uretal stents placed to allow urine to travel unhindered from the kidney to the bladder, sometimes irritate the bladder and cause pain to the back and groin areas. They can be moved from the place and wandering in the bladder causing the patient to frequent urination and possibly cause blood to enter the urine. Physical activity can also cause the stent heart to move. Sometimes drug side effects can be lessened, and in most cases, they disappear when the stent is removed. Doctors recommend that patients with constant and severe pain or fever as a result of a stent should seek immediate medical attention.

stents-heart-side-effects

Patients with stents heart side effects of devices with medications sometimes present with blood clots, and in some cases allergic reactions to the stent itself coated. This is usually treated with medication; however, scarring at the site of the stent heart can be a common side effect. Medication-coated stents can also cause gastrointestinal bleeding, flu-like symptoms, chest pain, and strokes. Studies have shown that these symptoms and effects can also occur in nude mesh stents, yet appear to be more potent in medical devices. Although not as common, other stent side effects are lung disease and even cancer.

  • A stent heart is a supporting device introduced into the body.
  • While recovering from the surgery, patients need to be careful to sit upright while eating to ensure food goes through the stent.
  • Stents are used to keep blood vessels free of blockages.
  • Blood clotting, calcification, bleeding, and pain are among the possible side effects of using stents in coronary artery procedures.
  • Some stents heart side effects in the treatment of coronary blockages can cause chest pain.

Heart arrhythmia is a disorder characterized by an accelerated or severely slowed heartbeat. The change in heart rate is due to an increase or decrease in electrical activity in the heart muscle. Expansion of the heart is controlled by electrical signals or impulses from the brain. An interruption in the transmission of these electrical pulses may result in the suspension of a heartbeat. The values of a normal adult heartbeat are 60 to 100 beats per minute. If you have a heartbeat outside this area, talk to your doctor about it.

Arrhythmia is often a contraindication to sports.

When do you have to worry?

Benign arrhythmias manifest at the level of the atria (for example, atrial fibrillation) or the atrioventricular sinus. They do not lead to the death of the person. Malignant arrhythmias that can lead to death include tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation.

Causes of heart arrhythmia

Here are the main causes of irregular heartbeat and arrhythmias:

  • Coronary heart disease is a common cause of arrhythmia. It is a disorder in which the blood circulation in the coronary vessels is obstructed.
  • Stimulants such as smoking, alcohol abuse, drugs, and caffeine.
  • Abnormal sodium or potassium levels in the blood.
  • Some stomach disorders, such as a hiatus hernia or gastroesophageal reflux.
  • Stimulants in medicines for a cough and cold.
  • They can occur during convalescence after heart surgery.
  • Hypertension or high blood pressure.
  • Thyroid dysfunction or hyperthyroidism are less common causes of arrhythmias.
  • Myocardial damage or fibrosis of the heart due to myocardial infarction.
  • Diabetes and insulin.

Symptoms of heart arrhythmia

The symptoms of an irregular heartbeat are very vague. Sometimes the patient does not feel it at all. Patients with serious arrhythmias may have few symptoms, while others with significant symptoms may present a less severe condition.

Symptoms include:

  1. Intermittent chest pain or angina, the most common symptom of an irregular heartbeat
  2. Fast and irregular frequency, strong tapping of the heart
  3. Fainting or syncope
  4. Difficult breathing, especially under stress
  5. Excessive sweating
  6. Fear and restlessness
  7. General malaise
  8. Dizziness or dizziness
  9. Fatigue

Asymptomatic arrhythmia

The asymptomatic arrhythmia is not always harmless and may cause blood clotting in the heart and / or a reduction in the amount of blood being pumped.

Heart Arrhythmia At Night

Nocturnal irregular heartbeat can have various causes. The most common are :

  • Diabetes
  • Hyperthyroidism (hyperthyroidism)
  • high blood pressure or hypertension
  • Other heart diseases
  • Some medicines
  • Smoke
  • Stressful situations
  • Some natural remedies

Arrhythmia after eating

When we eat, a large amount of blood is diverted to the digestive tract. The body immediately responds to this situation and tries to maintain normal blood pressure by increasing the heart rate and narrowing certain arteries. If this mechanism does not work, postprandial hypotension may occur (drop in blood pressure after eating). Older people may have arrhythmias after eating. People who may experience cardiac arrhythmias after meals include those with high arterial blood pressure or Parkinson’s disease.

Causes and symptoms of the disorder can vary from person to person, possibilities are:

  1. Some people suffer from tachycardia only in certain situations, for example, at night in bed, after eating sweet foods or foods with a high sodium content, etc.
  2. Inadequate water intake, which thickens the blood and thus forces the heart to work to pump the blood.
  3. Dysfunction of an endocrine gland.
  4. Problems of the digestive system.
  5. Excessive enjoyment of coffee and other stimulants.
  6. Disorders of the vagus nerve.
  7. Hiatus hernia (diaphragmatic hernia).
  8. Gastroesophageal reflux.
  9. Liver or kidney disease.
  10. People with a rapid resting heartbeat may have arrhythmias after eating.

what-is-heart-arrhythmia

Atrial Fibrillation (AF)

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia. In this disease, the heart beats irregularly and too fast. AF can be chronic, persistent or paroxysmal. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation occurs occasionally and temporarily, and is short-lived, from a few seconds to a few days.

Ventricular arrhythmia

This is a heart disorder in which the irregular rhythm of the heart and heartbeats come from the heart chambers. It can be divided into: ventricular tachycardia, ventricular bradycardia, and ventricular fibrillation. Tachycardia means that the heart rate exceeds 100 beats per minute, while bradycardia is characterized by beats below 60 beats per minute. Ventricular fibrillation is a disease in which the heart beats quickly and irregularly. The result is a reduction of the pumped blood.

causes

  1. Drug side effects
  2. caffeine
  3. nicotine
  4. High sodium and potassium levels in the blood
  5. Necroses and fibroses of the heart muscle
  6. cardiomyopathy
  7. myocarditis
  8. Valvular heart disease
  9. Congenital heart disease

Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA)

Respiratory sinus arrhythmia refers to a change in heart rate that occurs during a natural breathing cycle. The vagus nerve is a cranial nerve that runs from the brain stem to the abdomen and plays an important role in the regulation of the heartbeat. It reduces the contraction force and the frequency of the heart. During inhalation and exhalation, cells of the medulla oblongata send a signal from the parasympathetic nervous system via this cranial nerve to the heart. This causes a cyclic variation of the heart rate. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is a physiological variant and is not considered abnormal. In fact, it is the loss of this normal reflex that signals a heart problem.

RSA is common in children and adolescents and usually goes away with self-growth. However, a doctor should be consulted on:

  1. Very fast and irregular heartbeat,
  2. Very slow heartbeat, 

Heart Arrhythmia in Children

What are the specific causes of heart arrhythmia in children?

  1. Congenital heart defect
  2. Side effect on medicines

Cardiac palpitations during pregnancy

What are the causes?

  1. Mental stress
  2. body changes
  3. Excessive caffeine consumption
  4. Physical stress
  5. anemia
  6. Lack of magnesium
  7. Side effects of drugs

Diagnostics and examination

Heart arrhythmia are diagnosed by listening to the stethoscope or by an electrocardiogram (ECG). For fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography is usually performed; in the 20th week of pregnancy usually a morphological ultrasound. If the gynecologist sees a congenital anomaly, he may request  chocardiography, as this examination is much more thorough.

Therapy of heart arrhythmia

In some arrhythmias, it does not require treatment, in other cases, rapid treatment must be used to prevent heart failure.

Possible treatments are:

Physical exercises

There are several physical exercises (physiokinesis therapy) that stimulate the stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system (the part of the nervous system that affects rest, digestion, energy recovery and recovery).

The techniques that affect the vagus nerve (vagal maneuvers) affect the parasympathetic nervous system and promote the health of the heart.

With regard to nutrition, stimulating foods, such as coffee and chocolate, are not recommended as they can affect the heart rate.

Treatment of the accelerated heartbeat

Cardioversion. If the tachycardia

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