Almonds are known to most people in the form of sweet marzipan or as part of cakes and pastries. Also candied or salted almonds are popular as a snack in between. Not quite so widespread is the knowledge of the nutritional importance and the diversity that lies in the nutritious kernels!

Not only can almonds be processed into liqueurs, puddings, spreads and delicious dessert sauces. Even as almond milk, the core of the inconspicuous drupe is becoming increasingly important. For people with protein intolerance and lactose intolerance or for vegans, it is, therefore, an ideal alternative to the supposedly indispensable cow’s milk.

Simply make almond milk yourself

To produce the versatile almond milk only a part of almonds and two parts of water are needed as starting raw materials. From 250 grams of almonds and 500 milliliters of water can thus produce 750 milliliters of almond milk. The almonds can be pre-soaked overnight and then skinned. For a sweeter flavor provide pitted dates.

Almonds and dates are minced with the food processor, blender or blender to a fine pulp and mixed with the appropriate amount of water. If the mixture shows a milky-white, homogeneous texture, almond milk can be passed through a fine sieve or cloth to strain the solid ingredients. Afterward, the almond milk is ready for immediate consumption or further processing as desired.

Possible uses of almond milk

Whether vegans, allergy sufferers or people with special nutritional requirements: almond milk enriches every menu in a variety and healthy way because basically the milk from the almond can be used as well as their “animal” counterpart. Milkshakes, desserts, and mueslis can be prepared from almond milk, as well as fruit shakes, yogurt variations, and sweet creams, and even coffee makes almond milk an aromatic treat.

For the preparation of delicious milk drinks, almond milk can be mixed with commercial drinking cocoa or flavored with cinnamon or natural vanilla. But not only sweet delicacies can be made from the almond milk. Spicy dips, white herbal or “cream sauces” and even almond milk aioli are also possible. When used for savory dishes almond milk can also be used in an unsweetened form.

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Nutritional Value of almond milk compared to cow’s milk

Although cow’s milk is quite healthy. In highly processed form, however, many dairy products today are sweetened too much or provided with artificial flavors, dyes, and other additives.

Also, the basis of our modern dairy production – factory farming – raises ethical questions that are driving more and more people to consciously avoid cow’s milk. Last but not least, one’s own well-being forces many people to avoid cow’s milk. Whether lactose intolerance or protein allergy – even in the context of a dietary diet, almond milk is a tasty and wholesome alternative.

Thus, the dates used as a “sweetener” are more digestible than lactose and provide not only fast energy but also vital ingredients such as iron, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, copper and various minerals that support the body’s metabolism.

As a purely herbal product, almond milk also contains no saturated fatty acids, but simply or polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as omega 6 and omega 9. In addition, the amino acids contained are optimally absorbed by the body and help build muscle and tissue.

As an unencumbered natural product, it is much more than just a “milk substitute”!

Bee pollen has been used for centuries as folk remedies: it has been referred to as a sedative, astringent, aphrodisiac and anti-upset stomach in various crops as early as the 1100s and 1200s. Today bee pollen is heralded as a superfood, with claims that it has anti-aging properties and also that it contains all the nutrients needed for human life. But are these claims too good to be true? Let’s see if bee pollen gets up control.

What is Bee Pollen?

Before diving into all sorts of benefits of bee pollen consuming, it is helpful to actually understand which bee pollen is. When bees are looking for nectar to make honey, they collect pollen along the way. The byproduct of this pollen, combined with the digestive enzymes bees, is called bee pollen. It is packed by the bees and stored in small balls in the hive and is the main source of protein for the hive.

It is important that bee pollen is not the same as honey, royal jelly or honeycomb to note, the other by-products of bees are the health benefits can have.

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Bee Pollen Nutritional Values

Bee pollen is rich in vitamins, minerals, amino acids, antioxidants, and trace elements. But to say that it has every nutrient needed for human life is a stretch. The exact amount of nutrients depends on the plants of the pollen, and the protein harvested in bee pollen is more difficult for humans to digest protein from other sources. Nutritional value also decreases with time after harvest and how it is stored.

Bee Pollen and Allergies

Another bee pollen claim is that by taking local bee pollen you can expose your body to all the different pollens in the air. Over time, your body will become desensitized to the pollen of the season and your allergies will disappear. However, the FDA has specifically cracked on bee pollen labeling because there is not enough evidence to say that preventing bee pollen is allergies.

In addition, some people are actually allergic bee pollen. The reactions to bee pollen and bee pollen supplements in those who are allergic can range from mild to fatal and are wheezing, malaise, rashes or anaphylaxis. If you are prone to allergies and asthma, you should not experiment with bee pollen.

The Bottom Line About Bee Pollen and Health

Best of all, bee pollen could be an alternative to your daily vitamin, but the evidence is not there yet. All of the immune-related, anticancer claims of bee pollen are centered on vitamins and found in minerals. You can get these vitamins and minerals from multiple sources, not just from bee pollen.