Intermittent Claudication

The medical term for intermittent claudication is intermittent claudication – translated: intermittent limping. Just like the colloquial term intermittent claudication, this term indicates the typical symptoms of this condition. Those affected can only run or walk short distances painlessly. After a few meters, the pain forces patients with intermittent claudication to stand. So that this is not so noticeable, those affected like to stand in front of shop windows and look apparently interested in the displays. Actually, they are just waiting for the pain to pass and for them to continue on their way.

Intermittent claudication as stage II of PAVK

Intermittent claudication is stage II of PAVK. Information on stages I, III, and IV can be found in the paVK clinical picture.

Stage II is divided again into II a and II b. The subdivision is based on the walking distance that those affected can walk without pain. In stage II a it is more than 200 meters, in stage II b the legs already hurt at a distance of less than 200 meters.

Symptoms

In addition to the typical calf pain when walking, some patients with intermittent claudication also experience pain in the thighs and buttocks. Often there is also a feeling of weakness in the legs (tired legs). As a result of the lack of blood circulation, the skin on the lower leg sometimes appears pale and cool. Dark spots, wounds, and inflammation on the lower leg are also possible symptoms of intermittent claudication.

Intermittent Claudication

Causes

As with paVK, atherosclerosis and the resulting insufficient blood flow are the main causes of the disease in intermittent claudication. Risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, elevated blood lipid levels, and high blood pressure or metabolic syndrome increase the risk of intermittent claudication.

Treatment

Therapy for intermittent claudication consists in the treatment of peripheral arterial circulatory disorder. You can find out more about the different therapy options in the paVK guide.