Ischemic heart disease. Ischemia is a decrease in blood supply to a body organ, tissue or partially arrested by constriction or blockage of the blood vessels, and it is the right medical term for reduced blood flow to the heart. Cured or blocked arteries usually cause us, and it is the leading cause of death in most Western countries. The growth of these tissues is called arteriosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis typically begins in early adolescence but is rarely diagnosed until late in life usually due to a stroke or heart attack. Autopsies of healthy young men who died during the Korean and Vietnam War showed signs of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment can stop the progression of atherosclerosis and prevent a medical emergency.

According to the United States data for 2004 for about 65% of men and 47% of women, the first symptom of atherosclerosis is a heart attack or sudden cardiac death (death within one hour after onset of symptoms) or obstruction of the arteries that cause the Brain as a result of a stroke.

Another problem that can cause ischemic heart disease is an aneurysm. It is a localized, pathological, blood-filled dilation of a blood vessel causing a weakling from the vascular wall. Plaque forms in the arteries causing it an obstacle and the blood flow around the constipation pressure on the walls of the arteries. This can cause the walls of the arteries to balloon out and weaken as the blood moves around the obstacle. If one of these balloons or aneurysms explodes then death can occur within minutes.

When the plaque is displaced from the arterial walls it will travel into the heart and cause one of the blood vessels of the heart to get blocked, causing a heart attack. If the plaque gets lodged in one of the blood vessels, the blood supply to the brain, then it becomes a stroke.

Ischemic is caused by a diet rich in fats and physical inactivity. A high-fat diet leads to high levels of cholesterol in the blood. The American Heart Association offers a range of guidelines for total blood cholesterol and heart disease risk. The desirable LDL is less than 100 mg/dl. However, the report from the National Cholesterol Education Program in 1987 suggesting that total blood cholesterol should be below 200 mg / dL of normal blood cholesterol when cholesterol levels between 200 and 239 mg / dL are considered borderline high, and higher than 240 mg/dl is considered high cholesterol.

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Many scientists, nutritionists, and activists are concerned about ischemic heart disease, and they are trying to educate the American people into a healthier diet. And this power of healthy suggestion seems to work on restaurants. Especially since 2004, fast food chains have begun to offer healthier menu options such as yogurt, salads, and fruits. Many restaurants now print some nutritional information on their menus and specifically offer heart-smart recipes.

Over-the-counter products and Vitamins are common and can help relieve heart diseases such as Pectin, Foti, Vitamin C, Niacin, and EPA. Foti also called He Shou Wu in China is legendary in his ability to extend life. Modern studies have shown that Foti has the ability to lower serum cholesterol, prevent premature gray hair, promote red cell growth, increase blood and longevity at the cellular level. This herb raises the level of naturally occurring antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the body. Foti can reduce blood cholesterol by inhibiting intestinal absorption, which helps to reduce atherosclerosis and other heart diseases.

Niacin is the next thing, a perfect treatment that corrects most causes of coronary heart disease. Niacin blocks the release of fatty acids from the fat cells. Niacin plays an important role in gene expression, energy production, and hormone synthesis. You can not live without it. Niacin also tends to alter LDL particle distribution to larger particle size and improve HDL functioning. The intake of 3 g of niacin for less than two weeks to reduce serum cholesterol by 26 percent.

Vitamin C has been shown to counteract the development of cholesterol deposits in the arteries. Within hours of receiving vitamin C patients showed a sharp decline in blood cholesterol.

Pectin limits the amount of cholesterol your body can absorb. High pectin in apples can count why “One day keeps the doctor away”.

Studies of Greenland Eskimo’s lack of heart attacks have shown that Eico Sapentaenoic Acid (EPA) lowers cholesterol significantly, even more than polyunsaturated fat. It also triggers a significant reduction in triglycerides. Salmon oil is one of the most famous natural EPA sources.

If you are at risk of heart disease then you will find a good health care professional before beginning any kind of home treatment.

Always ask your doctor before using this information, this article is nutritional in nature and is not considered medical advice.

Cardiomegaly is not a disease, but the symptom of a problem with the heart, which causes it to become enlarged. Your heart may become enlarged during pregnancy, or due to a condition that puts stress on the heart, such as coronary artery disease, prolapse or stenosis of one of the heart valves, or problems in the electrical heart rhythm. Occasionally the cause of an enlarged heart may not be known.

The symptoms of cardiomegaly are variable. In the early stages, no symptoms will be felt. Then, as the heart continues to grow, some people will not experience any symptoms at all, while others experience shortness of breath, dizziness, an abnormal heart rate, cough, chest pain or swelling in the feet. The symptoms may be caused by the condition that causes the heart to be enlarged. For example, if your heart valves have been damaged by rheumatic heart disease, you may notice an irregular heartbeat, also called an arrhythmia. Some cardiac arrhythmias cause shortness of breath and dizziness.

High blood pressure causes the heart to work harder to pump blood through the body. When the heart needs to beat faster or harder, the muscles thicken producing cardiomyopathy or stiffening of the heart muscle, which can lead to cardiomegaly over time.

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A heart attack, infections, connective tissue disorders, congenital heart disease, certain medications, and cancer radiation can all damage heart, producing enlargement. Pulmonary hypertension or high blood pressure in the lungs can increase the heart’s workload, causing the right side to be enlarged.

Iron deficiency anemia, resulting in a lack of red blood cells, produces a domino effect. If there are fewer red blood cells to transport oxygen, the heart must work harder to pump more blood to form the lack of oxygen. Over time, untreated anemia can lead to an enlarged heart. On the other hand, too much iron, or a problem with iron metabolism can put pressure on the left side of the heart, weakening the muscles and making balancing cardiomegaly.

Thyroid disorders, both a sluggish thyroid and an overactive thyroid can cause heart problems and cardiomegaly. A rare blood disorder called amyloidosis causes amyloids to build up abnormal proteins in the heart because of it’s an enlargement.

Cardiomegaly may be asymptomatic or very serious, depending on the underlying cause or heart disease. The aim of the treatment is to control the symptoms and reduce whatever damage is caused by the factors causing enlargement of the heart. Cardiomegaly cannot be cured, and usually can not be reversed, but it can be successfully treated and the symptoms controlled.

The American Dietetic Association says that a low-fat diet helps people achieve and maintain weight loss goals and improve health. Weight loss and a low-fat diet with exercise help people reduce their risks of developing heart disease, stroke, certain cancers, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. When people reduce the amount of fat consumed, they replace fats with nutritious, satiety. The American Dietetic Association says that although the weight loss and low-fat diet go hand in hand, people still need to consume healthy fats.

Low-Fat Diets and Weight Loss Programs

The Vanderbilt University Department of Psychology states that weight loss programs like Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers, Pritikin, and Ornish are low-fat diets. These diets help people lose unwanted pounds by limiting the amount of fat consumed. Fruits and vegetables take the place of fatty foods because of their nutritional value. People follow personalized menus, outlining what foods to eat and disheartening scams. Customers choose from a food list to make sure they get their daily diet. Dieters learn to choose healthy foods and build their own daily meal plans.

How to Low Fat Diet Help with Weight Loss

Weight loss and low-fat diet work together to reduce pounds, as lower high-fat foods contain fewer calories than more fatty foods. Vanderbilt University has found that because low-fat foods are less dense, people can eat more of them and feel full faster. This helps dieters lose weight and get healthy weights. For weight loss, people should consume less than 30 percent of their calories from fat.

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Low-fat diet and obesity-related diseases

People undertake low-fat diets to lose weight and reduce their risks of developing obesity disorder such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol. These conditions occur because of excess fat storage in the body. Foods eaten on a low-fat diet, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber to combat the conditions associated with obesity.

Low Fat does not mean No Fat

Although low-fat diets promote weight loss, people still need healthy fats for the body to function properly. McKinley Health Center states that fat helps the body grow and develop, serves as an energy source, absorbs vitamins, cushions organs and maintains cell membranes. Replace saturated fats and trans fats with polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. Foods that are good fats include salmon and other fatty fish, trout, herring, tuna, mackerel, nuts, seeds, and avocados.

Exercise

Exercise plays an important role in supporting weight loss on a low-fat diet. Exercise regularly burns excess fat and calories effectively when combined with a low-fat diet. Overweight and sedentary people start with simple activities such as 30 minutes of physical activity a day, such as walking and low-impact aerobics.

Pulmonary edema can be manifested by sudden onset of severe breathlessness, rattling breath and coughing attacks.

Causes: What causes pulmonary edema?

The cause of pulmonary edema is either an increase in pressure within the pulmonary vessels or an increase in the permeability of the pulmonary vascular walls. Sometimes combinations of both causes are present.

Cardiac Pulmonary Edema

When the pressure within the vessels increases, it is mostly due to heart disease. One speaks of a cardiac pulmonary edema. For example, a heart attack, an inflammation of the heart muscle, a disease of the coronary vessels or too high a blood pressure in pre-existing heart failure underlying.

These diseases weaken the left ventricle. As a result, they can not pump the oxygen-rich blood provided by the lungs fast enough into the body. The blood builds up in the pulmonary vein. The congestion increases the pressure on the blood vessels. As a result, blood fluid escapes from the vessels and is forced into the lung tissue. The walls of the blood vessels work like filters and allow only the liquid to pass.

The remaining blood components, such as red blood cells or other cells, are held back. The fluid first accumulates in the interstices of the cells and can then penetrate into the interior of the alveoli. As a result, they can perform their task increasingly poorly and oxygen uptake is becoming increasingly difficult.

Altitude Pulmonary Edema

A special feature of the pulmonary edema was the so-called high-altitude edema. It is triggered in mountain climbing at high altitude in the first two to three days by a combination of oxygen deficiency and low air pressure. The vessels contract and cause an increase in blood pressure, which overloads the left ventricle and creates a backlog.

Non-cardiac pulmonary edema

In non-cardiac pulmonary edema, the most common cause is damage to the membranes of the fine pulmonary capillaries. As a result, they lose part of their barrier function; blood fluid, together with smaller cell components, can penetrate into the tissue of the lung. The more effective the lymphatic vessels can initially remove the excess fluid, the slower the development of symptoms.

In most cases, ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome) is the cause of membrane damage. In this case, the lungs react to massive damage, for example from infections with viruses, inhalation of toxic gases, medication, severe burns, serious cardiovascular shock or blood poisoning. Rarely, pulmonary embolism, overdose in anesthesia, or stroke can increase membrane permeability.

“Another cause is damage to the liver and kidneys, which leads to a drop in albumin in the blood – a specific blood protein,” says Köhler. Due to the lack of protein, the blood fluid cannot be kept in the necessary amount in the blood vessels and thus reaches the cell gap to the outside.

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Diagnosis

For diagnosis, the doctor asks questions about the underlying and concomitant diseases of the heart, lungs and other organs. When listening to the lungs with the stethoscope rattling noises fall on, which sometimes are already audible with the naked ear. An x-ray examination can be used to determine whether water is actually in the lungs. Important indications for pulmonary edema include accelerated breathing, increased heart rate and blueing of the skin and mucous membranes. An ECG, echocardiography and other examinations target the underlying cause.

Therapy: How is pulmonary edema treated?

Pulmonary edema is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition requiring intensive medical treatment. Patients should be transported to the hospital as soon as possible. As a first measure, an upper body and lower legs are helpful. As a result, the blood flows back to the heart slower, so this is relieved.

Breathing can be assisted by the delivery of oxygen via a nasogastric tube or a mask. In an advanced stage, positive pressure ventilation, in some cases artificial respiration is necessary. Most patients are supplied with painkillers and tranquilizers.

Dehydrating medications (diuretics) ensure that the water drains from the tissue. This not only improves the oxygen exchange at the alveoli but also relieves the blood pressure by reducing the volume of fluid and thus reduces the burden on the heart. Drugs that dilate the vessels lower the pressure on the heart, improving the oxygen supply.

All other measures depend on the underlying cause. In case of height elevation edema, sufferers should descend as soon as possible. In addition, oxygen delivery, vasodilating drugs, and positive pressure ventilation may help.

It is well known that in many ways there is an interaction between the diet and the aging process. Nutritional problems of the elderly population are increasing due to susceptibility to chronic diseases. Deteriorating organ functions can affect metabolism, digestion, absorption of nutrients and excretion. Eighty percent of people over the age of 65 suffer from at least one chronic disease and diet plays a significant role in the prevention and recovery of a disease. For this reason, the importance of nutrition for the elderly should by no means be undervalued.

Energy demand changes with aging due to a higher body fat percentage and lower levels of lean muscle tissue. Decreased activity can lead to a further decline in calorie requirements. The challenge is to meet the same nutritional needs as at a young age while consuming fewer calories. The solution lies in the selection of nutrient-rich foods with a high nutrient density per calorie. The protein requirement does not change significantly in older adults, although the demand for protein may vary due to impairments or diseases.

Pay attention to the reduced fat content in food

It is advisable for older people to pay attention to a reduced total fat content in the diet. Desirable is a daily calorie intake, which does not consist of more than 30% fat. 60% of all calories should be covered by the supply of carbohydrates. The focus should be on complex, natural carbohydrates, as they contain many vital substances. Glucose tolerance decreases with age, and a lower intake of refined carbohydrates puts less strain on your body.

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High-fiber diet

Also, a high-fiber diet is recommended. Dietary fiber is found only in plant foods and, with adequate hydration, provides normal bowel function. In addition, it is believed that the high-fiber diet can reduce intestinal inflammation. Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, grains, seeds, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber.

The fluid requirement in old age

Water is the most important thing, especially for seniors, because the water content of the body decreases as you get older. Water fulfills many essential functions. Adequate water supply relieves the function of the kidneys, as the kidney function tends to decrease with age. Drinking 5-8 glasses or at least 1.5 liters of water daily is recommended. However, not only does the fluid need to be covered with water, but it also contains water in other beverages, such as tea, coffee, and juice spritzers. Older people often do not have a pronounced thirst and dehydration easily, so the water intake should be habitual and not be waiting until the thirsty. It is important that the nutrition for the elderly also the correct amount of drinking is taken into account.

Declining odor and taste

The gradual decrease in the sense of smell and taste over the course of one’s age can affect the appetite, as the food no longer seems so tasty. As a result, older people often tend to sweeten and spice up their food. However, increased consumption of salt and sugar should be avoided at all costs, and herbs and other spices should be used instead.

Problems when shopping

Also, the loss of vision may prove to be a hindrance in the context of nutrition in old age. Older people often find it difficult to read food prices and small-print nutritional and descriptive information when shopping. In addition, many do not understand the information on the food packaging and therefore can not assess whether a product is beneficial to their health. Although these restrictions generally do not have a general effect, they may affect the ability to eat healthily.

Vitamins Minerals and trace elements

If medications are used to control certain diseases, such as high blood pressure or heart disease, the need for electrolytes, sodium, and potassium in the elderly may be altered and the diet should be adjusted to these changing needs.

Osteoporosis prevention

Vitamin D is important for bone health. Just like calcium and vitamin K, vitamin D has a preventive effect on osteoporosis. Older people often have a vitamin D deficiency. Since vitamin D is mainly formed by the sunlight in the body, you can prevent a deficiency by sufficient sunlight. Vitamin D is also found in richer types of sea fish, liver, egg yolks, and dairy products. In some cases, the intake of vitamin D supplements may be appropriate.

Vitamin B12

There is also a lack of vitamin B12 (also known as cobalamin) in older adults. This is often due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 due to stomach or bowel disease or drug use. In some cases, artificial vitamin B12 intake may be required. Vitamin B12 is important for various essential metabolic processes in the body and for the formation of red blood cells. In addition, vitamin B12 ensures the proper functioning of the nervous system and a trouble-free and normal brain activity.

Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause various neurological symptoms, including memory and dementia, vision impairment, and sensory disorders.