Ischemic heart disease. Ischemia is a decrease in blood supply to a body organ, tissue or partially arrested by constriction or blockage of the blood vessels, and it is the right medical term for reduced blood flow to the heart. Cured or blocked arteries usually cause us, and it is the leading cause of death in most Western countries. The growth of these tissues is called arteriosclerosis.

Atherosclerosis typically begins in early adolescence but is rarely diagnosed until late in life usually due to a stroke or heart attack. Autopsies of healthy young men who died during the Korean and Vietnam War showed signs of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment can stop the progression of atherosclerosis and prevent a medical emergency.

According to the United States data for 2004 for about 65% of men and 47% of women, the first symptom of atherosclerosis is a heart attack or sudden cardiac death (death within one hour after onset of symptoms) or obstruction of the arteries that cause the Brain as a result of a stroke.

Another problem that can cause ischemic heart disease is an aneurysm. It is a localized, pathological, blood-filled dilation of a blood vessel causing a weakling from the vascular wall. Plaque forms in the arteries causing it an obstacle and the blood flow around the constipation pressure on the walls of the arteries. This can cause the walls of the arteries to balloon out and weaken as the blood moves around the obstacle. If one of these balloons or aneurysms explodes then death can occur within minutes.

When the plaque is displaced from the arterial walls it will travel into the heart and cause one of the blood vessels of the heart to get blocked, causing a heart attack. If the plaque gets lodged in one of the blood vessels, the blood supply to the brain, then it becomes a stroke.

Ischemic is caused by a diet rich in fats and physical inactivity. A high-fat diet leads to high levels of cholesterol in the blood. The American Heart Association offers a range of guidelines for total blood cholesterol and heart disease risk. The desirable LDL is less than 100 mg/dl. However, the report from the National Cholesterol Education Program in 1987 suggesting that total blood cholesterol should be below 200 mg / dL of normal blood cholesterol when cholesterol levels between 200 and 239 mg / dL are considered borderline high, and higher than 240 mg/dl is considered high cholesterol.

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Many scientists, nutritionists, and activists are concerned about ischemic heart disease, and they are trying to educate the American people into a healthier diet. And this power of healthy suggestion seems to work on restaurants. Especially since 2004, fast food chains have begun to offer healthier menu options such as yogurt, salads, and fruits. Many restaurants now print some nutritional information on their menus and specifically offer heart-smart recipes.

Over-the-counter products and Vitamins are common and can help relieve heart diseases such as Pectin, Foti, Vitamin C, Niacin, and EPA. Foti also called He Shou Wu in China is legendary in his ability to extend life. Modern studies have shown that Foti has the ability to lower serum cholesterol, prevent premature gray hair, promote red cell growth, increase blood and longevity at the cellular level. This herb raises the level of naturally occurring antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the body. Foti can reduce blood cholesterol by inhibiting intestinal absorption, which helps to reduce atherosclerosis and other heart diseases.

Niacin is the next thing, a perfect treatment that corrects most causes of coronary heart disease. Niacin blocks the release of fatty acids from the fat cells. Niacin plays an important role in gene expression, energy production, and hormone synthesis. You can not live without it. Niacin also tends to alter LDL particle distribution to larger particle size and improve HDL functioning. The intake of 3 g of niacin for less than two weeks to reduce serum cholesterol by 26 percent.

Vitamin C has been shown to counteract the development of cholesterol deposits in the arteries. Within hours of receiving vitamin C patients showed a sharp decline in blood cholesterol.

Pectin limits the amount of cholesterol your body can absorb. High pectin in apples can count why “One day keeps the doctor away”.

Studies of Greenland Eskimo’s lack of heart attacks have shown that Eico Sapentaenoic Acid (EPA) lowers cholesterol significantly, even more than polyunsaturated fat. It also triggers a significant reduction in triglycerides. Salmon oil is one of the most famous natural EPA sources.

If you are at risk of heart disease then you will find a good health care professional before beginning any kind of home treatment.

Always ask your doctor before using this information, this article is nutritional in nature and is not considered medical advice.

A low-fat diet program for high cholesterol is concerned about consuming a variety of low-fat, heart-healthy foods as propagated by the American Heart Association (AHA). These foods can help remove harmful cholesterol from the body. In addition to eating the most beneficial foods, they need you to be prepared in a healthy manner to get optimal results. Plus, no heart-healthy diet completely without exercise, a known cholesterol-lowering factor.

Heart-healthy foods

Eat heart-healthy food. Be in accordance with the AHA, heart-healthy foods are high in fiber, low in fat and high in antioxidants. These heart-healthy foods can increase your “bad” cholesterol level (LDL) as well as decrease your “good” cholesterol level (HDL). Soluble fiber helps remove harmful cholesterol from the body.

Eat soluble fiber foods. Notable sources of soluble fiber include whole grains, lentils and beans, nuts and seeds, fruits and vegetables, and healthy oils of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated varieties. The USDA recommends eating at least 10g of soluble fiber daily to lower your LDL.

Eat oatmeal. A 1 1/2 cup serving of oatmeal, it says in the Mayo Clinic, contains 6 grams of soluble fiber. In fresh fruit and increase soluble fiber of 4 g. Top with cinnamon and low-fat milk to start your low-fat diet for high cholesterol day nutritiously.

Eat plant sterol foods as part of your low-fat diet for high cholesterol. Plant sterols contain a strong lowering of the cholesterol property along with many beneficial antioxidants. According to the American Dietetic Association, herbal sterols are notable in low-fat soy products such as tofu, tempeh, soy and soy milk; walnuts; avocados; Linseed and sunflower seeds. You can also buy foods fortified with plant sterols such as orange juice, margarine and fruit smoothies.

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Not Heart Healthy Foods

Watch out for saturated and trans fats. Foods containing these fats, according to the Mayo Clinic and USDA, can increase your “bad” cholesterol levels.

Saturated fats are found in animal products such as offal and whole-fat dairy products, including egg yolks and red meats. These fats are also found in fried foods, processed and prepackaged foods, biscuits, bread, and many fast foods.

Food Preparation Methods

Choose heart-healthy cooking methods. According to the AHA and the USDA, if your food is made in an unhealthy method, such as deep frying, it can increase your LDL level. Healthy Cooking Methods to choose high cholesterol from your low-fat diet include steaming, grilling, poaching, and baking (without excessive oils).

Physical activity

Exercise. Your low-fat high-cholesterol diet must also include daily physical activity, according to the AHA. It is recommended to have 30 minutes daily for at least five days a week. The exercise does not have to be exhausting for you to reap health benefits. Physical activity can lower your LDL. Choose activities that you are happy with and switch to avoid boredom.

Introduction

Blood pressure is the measurement of the power of your blood on the walls of the blood vessels. Their blood vessels are the arteries, veins, and capillaries. Blood pressure is an important concept as it helps to drive up the oxygen and nutrients that your body needs to survive throughout your system. Unfortunately, when the blood pressure becomes too high, it can potentially damage the blood vessels. Two substances that can contribute to higher blood pressure, if not used in moderation, are alcohol and caffeine.

Alcohol

According to the American Heart Association, drinking alcohol in moderation can potentially have a positive effect on your heart. However, “in moderation” means only one or two drinks a day for men and only one drink a day for women. Once you start consuming more than these, your blood pressure can begin to be adversely affected. Alcohol first does this by disrupting blood flow to the heart by removing nutrient-rich blood from the heart. Alcohol is also high in calories, resulting in obesity, which in turn also raises blood pressure levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, if you are currently taking antihypertensive medication, alcohol can interfere with their ability to work, putting you at an even higher risk of dangerously high blood pressure.

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Caffeine

Caffeine can also be beneficial in moderation. According to men’s health, caffeine can help actively activate dopamine molecules and can also help fight off Alzheimer’s. But just like alcohol, when not used in moderation, caffeine can also have harmful effects on your blood pressure. Caffeine affects the blood pressure by narrowing the blood vessels. It does this by binding with adenosine receptors in the body, which blocks the possibility of properly functioning adenosine. Adenosine is a hormone that is partially responsible for helping keep blood vessels far enough for blood to pass through easily. Caffeine also stimulates the release of adrenaline and adrenal cortisol. One of the side effects of releasing these chemicals into the bloodstream is an increase in blood pressure.