What Is Right Heart Failure and How to Recognize

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Sometimes we can recognize warning signs of our body in everyday things: the otherwise super-fitting elegant loafers have to be exchanged for extra-wide health shoes from the medical supply store? The responsible swollen feet can be the first symptom of right-sided heart failure, also called right heart failure. What is right heart failure in the body and how to recognize Right Heart Failure, read now.

Symptoms of Right Heart Failure

Simply put, in right heart failure, the right half of the heart is no longer working properly. This is often the result of advanced left heart failure. If the two forms come together, it is also called global heart failure. When it comes to the chronic form, the symptoms of heart failure can go unnoticed for a long time right. Common signs of right heart failure include:

  • Rapid weight gain and swollen ankles and feet indicate water retention in the tissues. If you press your finger on the thickened area, a dent remains that can last for several minutes.
  • Caution: A thrombosis (blood clot) can also cause swelling in the leg. In contrast to this disease, in case of right heart failure, however, both legs or feet are always swollen. A thrombosis must be treated immediately.

What happens with heart failure on the right?

Right heart failure is a weak pumping of the right half of the heart, which is responsible for the transport of oxygen-poor blood to the lungs. Normally, the right half of the heart works like this:

  1. Low-oxygen blood from the upper and lower half of the body flows into the right atrium.
  2. From the right atrium, the blood enters the right ventricle.
  3. The spent blood flows from the right ventricle into the lungs, where it is enriched with oxygen. This is called “small blood circulation”.

What-Is-Right-Heart-Failure

What happens if the right half of the heart is weakened?

This is simply explained: In right heart failure, more blood flows out of the systemic circulation than the impaired, right ventricle can carry on to the lungs. There is a backlog of spent blood in front of the right atrium, which can reach into the legs or neck. Sufferers suffer from swollen legs and thickened veins. In addition, this can increase the pressure in the veins so much that the liquid components of the blood are pressed into the surrounding tissue. This causes water retention (edema) in the feet, abdomen or other parts of the body.

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